Strategy 2009 combating thrips in chrysanthemum

As both Amblyseius swirskii and Amblyseius cucumeris only prey on thrips in the first larva phase, in many cases this does not give sufficient effects in combating an infestation such as thrips, populations of which can grow very explosively. We therefore recommend that thrips also be combated in other phases. Research has shown that 90-95% of thrips larvae pupate in the soil. Thrips control can therefore take place both on the plant and in the soil.

In the past two years, we at Koppert have achieved good results with A. swirskii in combination with the sprinkling of Entonem. With this strategy, we combat thrips larvae on the plant and thrips pupae and prepupae in the soil. Entonem is comprised of nematodes that live in symbiosis with a bacterium. The bacterium is responsible for the death of the thrips. Various research projects (including bio-tests on chrysanthemums) show that nematodes are particularly effective in combating thrips in the prepupa and pupa phases, while they are in the soil. In addition, it is very important to keep the number of A. swirskii in the crop at a high enough level throughout the cultivation period. This can be achieved by spreading A. swirskii and food into the crop simultaneously using the AIROBUG. As A. swirskii is provided with supplementary food in the crop, the population is kept more stable and thrips can be controlled more effectively.

Koppert has put together a package for chrysanthemum grower including Entonem, Swirski-Mite and Spidex as well as free use of the AIROBUG.

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